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HR INVESTIGATIONS BLOG

Blogs

  1. How Recruiting Challenges Can Lead to Employee Misconduct

    The recruiting challenge faced by government agencies is a tremendous one.  A March study by the National Association of State Chief Administrators found that government job posting rose 11% from 2013 to 2017, while the number of people applying for state jobs declined by 25%.  There are plenty of reasons; it is difficult to attract…

  2. Remind Employees How to Submit Complaints to Show You Are Serious About Stopping Misconduct

    For many employees, onboarding is the last step before they can begin their job.  It’s a deluge of paperwork, federally mandated workplace notifications, and agency-wide directives.  Sometimes, training videos are also required.  Once this process is completed, new employees can finally begin their job, meet their team, and learn about the reality of the job…

  3. Avoiding Agency Data Leaks

    Poor employee education and weak processes cause government data leaks, harming employees and leading to public scandals. Learn how to reduce your exposure to data leaks with this infographic.

  4. Critical HR Capabilities: Developing Relationships with Supervisors

    For many reasons, supervisors should be one of the best resources for HR departments.  At nearly any agency, there are many more supervisors than HR professionals. Most supervisors interact with their employees on a near-daily basis and are the first line of resolution for any problems employees are having in the course of their work,…

  5. Are Your Agency’s Employees Just Showing Up for a Paycheck?

    The best way to build camaraderie among employees is to lead them to work together toward a shared purpose.  Along the way, they will share experiences, leading to a shared identity as a member of the team.  Without that shared identity, it’s hard to build camaraderie. That’s why offices with these three traits not only…

  6. Establishing a Pattern of Facts in HR Investigations

    One of the most important jobs of an investigator is to establish a pattern of facts.  Multiple witnesses reporting the same sequence of events bolsters confidence in the accuracy of the claim.  Finding the same error at multiple locations establishes an agency-wide challenge.    And multiple instances of the same bad behavior help establish intentionality in…

  7. How to Survive Being Hit by a Bus

    There’s a term in business management and software development called the “bus factor”.  It’s a morbid way of referencing a critical component of any well-designed process. How many people would have to be hit by a bus before it stalls or falls apart because there aren’t enough people who know how to push it forward?…

  8. Why a Consistent Process is Critical to an HR Investigator’s Success

    Agencies that care about their culture and creating a positive work environment provide higher-level jobs and better pay to high-performing staff only if they treat their co-workers with respect.  In contrast, agencies that don’t care about values or culture tolerate bad behavior by promoting “high-performers” regardless of how they treat their co-workers, which makes the…

  9. Managing Out: Getting HR Investigation Testimony and Evidence Faster

    This is the second in a series of blogs on encouraging team members, co-workers and supervisors to help your team accomplish its objectives and pushing for your findings to lead to action. The first, Managing Up: Demonstrating the Value of Taking Action, can be found here. Thoroughly investigating complaints as quickly as possible is the…

  10. Managing Up: Demonstrating the Value of Taking Action

    This is the first in a series of blogs on encouraging team members, co-workers and supervisors to help your team accomplish its objectives and pushing for your findings to lead to action. Agency leaders have a mission to accomplish.  The vast majority of them have no corrupt intent – they simply want to lead an…